Postoperative Cure for Metastatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor
Korean J Helicobacter Up Gastrointest Res 2018;18(4):264-270
Published online December 10, 2018
© 2018 Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.

Eun Hyea Park, Jin Il Kim, Dae Yong Cheung, Soo-Heon Park

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeouido St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Jin Il Kim
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 10 63-ro, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul 07345, Korea
Tel: +82-2-3779-1519, Fax: +82-2-3779-1331, E-mail: jikim@catholic.ac.kr
Received May 3, 2018; Revised June 5, 2018; Accepted June 8, 2018.
The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research is an Open-Access Journal. All articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor derived from Cajal cells originating from the myotonic plexus. The expression of tyrosine kinase (KIT) membrane receptors that are active on KIT is inhibited by the KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate. GISTs are resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is not significantly beneficial for GISTs. With the development of imatinib mesylate, approximately 81.6% of patients with advanced and metastatic GIST exhibit an effect above the stabilization response, thereby increasing the survival time. However, imatinib mesylate alone is unlikely to cure metastatic GISTs. Even with a partial or stable response, imatinib mesylate may be used for a longer time period. However, resection of grossly visible lesions should be considered for patients with a stable response during surgical treatment. In this study, we present a case of GIST with liver metastasis after imatinib mesylate treatment, which was followed up without recurrence after partial resection.
Keywords : Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, Imatinib mesylate


December 2018, 18 (4)
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